BioFreeze http://www.biofreeze.com

Steri-Shoe Shoe Sanitizer http://www.sterishoe.com/

Drs Remedy Nail polish - http://www.remedynails.com/

 

Plantar fasciitis is the term commonly used to refer to heel and arch pain traced to an inflammation on the bottom of the foot.

 

How do you know you have it? The classic description is that it hurts like the devil when you get out of bed; the first few steps are excruciating, but reduce quickly (a few minutes, usually) once you start to walk. Later on, whenever you sit down and then get up again, PAIN! By afternoon, the foot usually aches, and by night "It just throbs".

 

More specifically, plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the connective tissue, called plantar fascia, that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts into the heel bone. Overpronation (going flatfoot) is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis. As the foot rolls inward excessively when walking, it flattens the foot, lengthens the arch, and puts added tension on the plantar fascia. Over time, this causes inflammation. Other causes may include having a long leg on that side, certain knee problems and even having a hip that turns out too much.

 

This is also known as heel spur syndrome, since the long-term consequence of walking this way may cause a calcium deposit on the bottom of the heel, which resembles a point. Whether a spur exists or not doesn't matter. It's the inflammation that causes the real pain. The condition is usually successfully treated with conservative measures, such as physical therapy, the use of anti-inflammatory medications, ice packs, cortisone (or homeopathic) injections, and orthotic devices. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications.

 

In persistent cases, Autologous Platelet Concentrate injections or even surgery may be used to treat the heel pain.